Reading

Part 1-Overview: How to teach high school student’s how to read: 5 Part blog series

How to teach high school student’s how to read: 5 Part blog series

Having spent 10 years in the education system should guarantee students have an adequate level of reading literacy. However, as I explained in my blog “Why can’t my high school English students read?” there are many reasons why students are entering high school with inadequate reading skills or as functionally illiterate. The PISA and OSSLT data, as well as years of Wechsler test data from my classes, demonstrate that the applied level and locally developed classes are reading at grade levels well below their current grade. Why this is happening isn’t as important to me, a high school teacher, as what I’m going to do about it now.

Given that good pedagogy demands that a teacher should start where the students are, I have spent more than a decade working to find ways to help my students improve their literacy skills. Many of these techniques are based on balanced literacy, which is already used in elementary schools, and leveraging the teachings of thought leaders in the reading field such as Penny Kittle and Kelly Gallagher. Based on my experience and learnings, I have created a reading program that is proven to be effective at improving students reading literacy (see OSSLT results in previous post). My reading program includes three main components: getting students to buy into the program, improving reading ability through the explicit teaching of reading strategies and ultimately fostering a love of reading which you can learn more about by following these links:

Learn all about the program in my 5 part blog series: How to teach high school students to read:

___________________________________________

If your interested in how to teach high school teachers how to read or you have questions or comments please feel free to leave a comment or contact me.

5 thoughts on “Part 1-Overview: How to teach high school student’s how to read: 5 Part blog series”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s